Reviews in New Yorker & NPR; Q&A at Powell’s

I’m happy about two new reviews of Overthrow. On the New Yorker website, Garth Greenwell focuses on the novel’s style, which he sees as the book’s most crucial protagonist.

And at NPR, Annalisa Quinn focuses on the novel’s metaphoric treatments of technological surveillance.

Meanwhile, the website of Powell’s bookstore in Portland has published a self Q&A that I wrote for them, including the disclosure that I collect whaling stereoviews and a drawing that I made of my writing desk.

Kirkus interview and last day on Chicago Review’s Instagram

My novel Overthrow goes on sale today. Call or click over to your local independent bookstore and buy it!

There’s a new interview of me by James McDonald Feder in Kirkus, mostly about the perils and rewards of writing a novel that touches on contemporary issues. And today is also the last day that I’m in “residency” at the Instagram account of the Chicago Review of Books.

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Hi, this is Caleb Crain, author of "Overthrow," which comes out today from @VikingBooks, on the 6th and final day of my Instagram "residency" here at @ChicagoRevBooks. At one point in "Overthrow," a character designs a logo for the impossibly utopian group that she belongs to, and it features a flying dove and a leaping dolphin. A couple of weeks ago, on a lark, I decided to make a stamp of the logo—or rather, three stamps, in blue, green, and black ink. Here they are, individually and (when you swipe to the next photo) together. Thanks for the opportunity to present these and my earlier photos! Since I started posting them, the novel has gotten some very generous reviews. The New York Times: "A 19th-century social novel for the 21st-century surveillance state." The Boston Globe: "Legitimately great psychological fiction." The Washington Post: "'Overthrow' accomplishes its mission." I hope you'll visit your local independent bookstore and pick up a copy! –Caleb

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“Interview” magazine & the Virtual Memories Show podcast

Two new interviews! In both of which my dumbphone has a cameo.

Christopher Bollen wrote up our conversation, which is published in Interview magazine, complete with a Warholesque photo illustration: Has Caleb Crain Written the First Occupy Wall Street Novel?”

And Gil Roth edited the audio of our conversation into episode 334 of his Virtual Memories Show podcast.

I had great fun talking to both!

In “Revolver Revue”

rozhovor-v-RR

I just got my copy of the spring 2015 issue of the Czech literary journal Revolver Revue. They’ve published an interview with me by Veronika Tuckerová, as well as her translation into Czech of an excerpt from my novel Necessary Errors. They illustrated the interview with an old Prague map that I had and with photos that I took in Prague in the early 1990s; it’s a really lovely presentation.

Leafing through the issue, I learn that my translator is something of a dark horse. In the same issue, Revolver Revue has published a portfolio of elegant, meditative paintings by her. She painted them, in tempera on paper, in the Holešovice neighborhood of Prague in 1990, and the window views and interior scenes are evocative of Giorgio Morandi in their subtlety and quietness.

An excerpt of “Necessary Errors” in Czech

Revolver Revue, spring 2015

The spring 2015 issue of the Czech literary journal Revolver Revue prints an interview with me conducted by Veronika Tuckerová, which she has translated into Czech, as well as an excerpt from my novel, which she has also translated. Very happy about this! Tuckerová reviewed the book in an earlier issue of Revolver Revue, and an English translation of her review has been published by the Aspen Institute.

In other news about the novel: the English-language book made an appearance in the 2014 year-end roundup of the film critic Daniel Carlson. An interview with me, translated into Italian, appears on the website Gioia, in the course of which a pretentious reference of mine to “negative capability” is transfigured into a new word, “kidcapability.” And a set of elegant photos of the Italian edition of the book appear on the website Federico Novaro.